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Mental Health Awareness Week and Aromatherapy

Posted on 20 May, 2020 at 10:29 Comments comments (7)
The 18-24 May is Mental Health Awareness Week and right now more than ever, with everything thing that is going on our mental health is so important.   
It has been estimated that 1 in 4 adults in the UK will experience mental health issues during 2020, but that figure will probably rise due to the current covid-19 pandemic and the effect it has had on our lives. Before corona virus hit, our fast-paced lives had become one of the main reason that so many of us were struggling with our mental health.  Then suddenly the majority of us were forced to stop, we had to stop working, socialising and leaving our homes. For some this time has been a blessing where we have been able to enjoy a slower pace, reconnect with our families and have been able to take the time to learn new skills or hone our talents. But for many it has been a time of isolation, loneliness, worry, boredom and frustration, and mental health problems have been exasperated.  
I have often written about the virtues of essential oils combined with massage to help many physical ailments, but aromatherapy comes into its own when used to tackle mental and emotional imbalances. Out of the five senses, our sense of smell is the only one that is directly linked to the Limbic Lobe of the brain.  Our brain processes scent via the olfactory system which then leads directly to the Limbic System. The Limbic system controls our emotions and stores learned memories; anxiety, depression, fear, anger, and joy all physically originate from this region. A certain fragrance can evoke memories and emotions before we are even consciously aware of it. The chemical messengers contained within the scent of essential oils trigger this primitive brain function and work to influence our emotions. Choosing different essential oil aromas and their underlying chemical compounds can bring about a powerful effect on our moods and general state of mind; our mental and emotional well-being. These are my top essential oils for helping with mental health issues-
Lavender –regarded as the ultimate essential oil for relaxing and balancing moods along with fighting stress. It is well renowned for its sedative property which can help combat insomnia and promote good sleep patterns. However keep doses low (max 3 drops in 10ml carrier) if used in excess lavender can actually act as a stimulant. 
Bergamot -has a calming effect; it is effective in tackling mild depression and insomnia. It has been used in trials for dependency and compulsiveness with great success due to its cenetring and relaxing properties.
Frankincense- Many studies have found that frankincense contains molecules that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, enabling it to carry much-needed oxygen into the brain, as well as stimulating the limbic area of the brain. It is the calming and grounding quality of Frankincense oil that proves to be beneficial in treating depression, anxiety and feelings of melancholy. It is an invaluable oil to use during meditation.
Geranium -releases negative feelings and emotions and helps to balance hormones. Geranium oil lifts the spirit and eases nervous tension and can help to release negative emotions and memories. This sweet flowery fragrance has a regulating effect on the nervous system and can help dispel depression, nervous anxiety and fear bringing about a sense of calm and wellness.
Chamomile has wonderful calming and relaxing properties that can help to reduce anxiety, dispel anger and release old emotions. It also has sedative properties which makes it valuable oil in tacking insomnia along with lavender oil.
Essential oils are traditionally used alongside massage to help tackle imbalances in mental health, but due to the current pandemic and need for us all to socially distance massage for the time being cannot be administered. There are many other ways to enjoy and benefit from the pleasures of essential oils.
Methods of use
Self-Massage- Massaging our own arms and hands, legs and feet or anywhere we can comfortably reach is not the same as receiving a massage from a professional but it can still have it benefits.  Essential oils are always diluted in suitable carrier oil or lotion. Use 3 drops of essential oil to 10ml carrier. Reduce down to 1-2 drops for facial use, and for use on children.
Inhalation - Add 8-12 drops of essential oil in 2 pints of hot water. Pour water into bowl, added essential oils cover the head with a towel and inhale. Take care; do not let oils enter the eye area. Asthma suffers should not use. Not a suitable method for young children.
Vaporisation - As essential oils are inhaled with this method it is excellent for creating a mood atmosphere, using in the sick room as a disinfectant and for removing unpleasant smells. The traditional oil burners with a tea light underneath are effective when 3-5 drops of essential oil are added to water. For electric appliances designed for this use follow manufacturer’s instructions, but usually 3-5 drops is sufficient. Keep well out of reach of children.
Direct Inhalation - Pour 2-3 drops of essential oil onto a tissue and sniff or use straight from the bottle by holding it about 5cm away from the nostrils and breathing deeply. Alternatively rub one drop of essential oil into the palms of the hands, cover the nose and mouth and inhale. Stick to the tissue method for children, and 1-2 drops is sufficient.
Bathing - Fill the bath with warm water and turn off the taps. ALWAYS dilute the essential oils. Add 3-6 drops of chosen essential oils to 1 tablespoon of carrier e.g. almond oil, full fat milk, honey, any non-perfumed bubble bath. Use only 1 drop of essential oil well diluted for children.
Foot Baths - As for bathing but use 1-4 drops of essential oil and soak feet for 5/10 minutes- bliss!
Practicing Mindfulness- Mindfulness is the art of living in the moment, being aware of our surroundings, reconnecting with the simple pleasures in life. Mindfulness takes practice but can become a valuable skill for life once mastered and aromatherapy can really help with the process.
Essential oils are concentrated and should always be used with care. Follow instructions given and do not be tempted to add more drops than recommended. Unless under the guidance of an Aromatherapist essential oils should not be used neat on the skin, but dissolved in a carrier oil, full fat milk, honey or other base. They must never be taken internally.
Always check the oils you are considering using- most modern essential oils should have an expiry date so check this. Essential oils are a natural product and do not contain preservatives so anything out of date should not be used on the skin as there is a risk of skin irritation.
Once you have established that the oils are in date check where you store them. Essential oils should be kept in their original dark coloured bottles. These dark coloured bottles protect the contents from sunlight, which can have a detrimental effect on essential oils, so the bathroom window sill is definitely not the place to keep them! They also need to be kept at a fairly constant temperature normal room temperature; extremes of heat/cold can cause the oils to deteriorate very quickly. Keep out of reach of children.
Enjoy experimenting with these lovely oils to make your life just a little easier, calmer and more fragrant. 
Although my aromatherapy clinic is currently closed I am available to answer any questions either by telephone, email or via my website. Please do get in touch if you need advice on which oils to use, how to use them or would like a bespoke blend made up for you. This service is free of charge there would only be costs involved if oils or blends were required and to cover postage.  
For now please take care and keep safe and well and be kind to yourself.
Paula x
 

 

The Safe Use Of Essential Oils at Home

Posted on 1 April, 2019 at 7:03 Comments comments (0)
I am often asked about using essential oils safely at home. My first response is always check the oils you are considering using- most modern essential oils should have an expiry date so check this. Essential oils are a natural product and do not contain preservatives so anything out of date should not be used on the skin as there is a risk of skin irritation. 
Once you have established that the oils are in date check where you store them. Essential oils should be kept in their original dark coloured bottles. These dark coloured bottles protect the contents from sunlight, which can have a detrimental effect on essential oils, so the bathroom window sill is definitely not the place to keep them! They also need to be kept at a fairly constant temperature normal room temperature; extremes of heat/cold can cause the oils to deteriorate very quickly. Keep out of reach of children.
Methods of use
Massage
Essential oils are always diluted in suitable carrier oil or lotion. Use 3 drops of essential oil to 10ml carrier. Reduce down to 1-2 drops for facial use.
Inhalation
Add 8-12 drops of essential oil in 2 pints of hot water. Pour water into bowl, added essential oils cover the head with a towel and inhale. Take care; do not let oils enter the eye area. Asthma suffers should not use. 
Vaporisation
As essential oils are inhaled with this method it is excellent for creating a mood atmosphere, using in the sick room as a disinfectant and for removing unpleasant smells. The traditional oil burners with a tea light underneath are effective when 3-5 drops of essential oil are added to water. For electric appliances designed for this use follow manufacturer’s instructions, but usually 3-5 drops is sufficient. Keep well out of reach of children.
Direct Inhalation
Pour 2-3 drops of essential oil onto a tissue and sniff or use straight from the bottle by holding it about 5cm away from the nostrils and breathing deeply. 
Bathing
Fill the bath with warm water and turn off the taps. ALWAYS dilute the essential oils. Add 3-6 drops of chosen essential oils to 1 tablespoon of carrier e.g. almond oil, full fat milk, honey, any non-perfumed bubble bath. 
Foot Baths
As for bathing but use 1-4 drops of essential oil and soak feet for 5/10 minutes- bliss!
**Pregnant and nursing mothers should only use essential oils under the guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner.**
**Seek professional advice before using essential oils for children.** 
Essential oils are concentrated and should always be used with care. Follow instructions given and do not be tempted to add more drops than recommended. Unless under an Aromatherapists guidance essential oils should not be used neat on the skin, but dissolved in a carrier oil, full fat milk, honey or other base. They must never be taken internally. 
As always please do not hesitate to contact me if you require any further advice.

My Top Three Essential Oils

Posted on 20 April, 2017 at 6:58 Comments comments (7)
The most difficult question you can ask any Aromatherapist is ‘What are your Top Three oils?’, but I’ll give it a go!
My number one oil can change daily depending on my mood and who I am working with at the time. I might open a tiny bottle of an essential not used for a while and think ’this has got to be my favourite, why have I neglected it for so long?’, then that can all change the next day!
Having said that I nearly always return to the classic oil Frankincense, mainly because of its power to visibly calm and comfort. It is my oil of choice when I am faced with an obviously anxious or nervous client, one drop, sniffed from a tissue, soothes and balances the emotions, helping to overcome stress by slowing and deepening the breath.
There have been numerous studies carried out to try and discover why this oil can have such a profound impact on our sense of calm. Frankincense contains molecules that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, enabling it to carry much-needed oxygen into the brain, as well as stimulating the limbic area of the brain. It is this calming and grounding quality of frankincense oil that proves to be beneficial in treating depression, anxiety and low moods. It is also for this reason that frankincense has been prized for thousands of years to help meditation and contemplation. Add to this its excellent reputation as an antiseptic, its valuable use when treating all respiratory conditions and the fact that it has proven anti-ageing properties it is easy to see why this oil remains firmly at Number One of my top three chart.
So what oil could possibly follow frankincense at the number two spot? It has to be Geranium, simply for its wonderful floral, grassy fragrance and for its superb balancing properties. This is the oil I recommend to all my female clients due to its regulating effect on the hormonal and the nervous systems, and the smell makes it a pleasure to use. I also use this oil on my male clients as they too benefit from its balancing properties but I would blend it with a masculine fragranced oil such as Sandalwood or Vetiver.

And in at number three is Rose otto. The fragrance is sublime, both warm and comforting, one sniff transports you to a summer garden filled with beautiful blooms. Because of the cost I reserve this oil for my skincare blends and for anyone experiencing loss or bereavement of any kind. Its ability to bring about emotional balance never ceases to amaze me, Rose has a spiritual influence and is used to balance and open the Heart Chakra.

Muscle Tension

Posted on 19 October, 2016 at 9:09 Comments comments (9)
Muscular Tension
Overused and overextended muscles cause tension. Any movement we make, no matter how small, involves muscles tensing and flexing. Any activity that entails repetitive movement from tapping away on a laptop to swinging a golf club, or during periods of stress and anxiety, can result in tight muscles that are ‘stuck’ in a tense state. Once these muscles refuse to relax they weaken and circulation of blood and lymph is impaired.
Once a muscle becomes inflexible it is very difficult to release it. Painkillers and muscle relaxants can be useful but they do not heal the muscle, they just reduce the discomfort felt. Massage is one of the best ways to manage muscular tension in the body, especially when combined with essential oils. Massage helps to release and stretch the ineffective muscles and loosens connective tissue. Kneading, pressing and rubbing areas of muscular tension results in the stimulation of the circulation to the area, this increased blood flow brings with it energy producing nutrients and oxygen. Massage not only relaxes and softens the muscles it helps to increase mobility and flexibility and to reduce pain as endorphins (the body’s natural painkillers) are released. 
 Used in conjunction with massage carefully chosen essential oils can provide two benefits; they penetrate deep into the muscle tissue and encourage the contracted muscle to expand, in turn relieving the physical pain, but they can also help with the emotional stress that results in physical tension.
There is a long list of essential oils that can be of benefit when massaging tense muscles. Any essential oils considered a relaxant will be of use, as will oils that have analgesic or anti-inflammatory properties. Some essential oils, such as eucalyptus and rosemary, have a cooling effect when applied to the skin, helping to take the heat out of inflamed muscles. Other oils are chosen for their rubefacient effects, that is a substance when applied topically to the body causes dilation of the capillaries and an increase in blood circulation, oils that fall into this category are sweet marjoram and ginger.
In my practice I have found that the main areas tension affects the muscles is lower (sacra)l area of the back, the upper back and neck , jawline, facial muscles and scalp. I have put together a special Aromatherapy Tension Busting Treatment that concentrates on all these areas.
 

Aromatherapy: A Natural Aid to a Good Nights Sleep

Posted on 4 November, 2015 at 8:44 Comments comments (8)
Aromatherapy: A Natural Aid to a Good Night’s Sleep

We spend one- third of our lives asleep. Sleep is as vital to humans as the air we breathe and the food we eat. Without sleep we become ill as good quality sleep helps our brain function, gives us a general feeling of well-being, aids our concentration, improves memory and mood and boosts our immune system. Most people function on far less sleep than they really need, this is due to modern lifestyles affecting our sleep patterns.

Aromatherapy offers a safe and natural aid to sleep problems without any of the side-effects sometimes experienced with sleeping tablets. Most people will be aware of, and may have used lavender to help them drift off. But did you know that lavender in larger quantities acts as a stimulant and can actually keep you awake? Two or three drops on a tissue placed inside your pillowcase is sufficient. Lavender is considered to be the ‘mother’ of all essential oils; it is a gentle balancer and has a strong action on our emotions, calming any imbalances. But there are many other essential oils that can aid a good night’s sleep.

An Aromatherapist will choose essential oils for sleep problems according to their individual effects. Any oils that are soothing and balancing are good to relieve anxiety and stress. Roman chamomile is a good oil as it helps calm the central nervous system. Bergamot has a refreshing aroma and is calming and sedating. It helps to balance moods, and can help prevent bad dreams. A warm bath (be careful with the temperature as a hot bath can be too stimulating just before bed), with a blend of bergamot  and chamomile (2-3 drops of each oil) added to the water once the taps have been turned off, can provide the right level of relaxation to ensure a good quality night’s sleep.

My favourite way of encouraging sleep is a foot massage whilst sat in bed. I use a blend of 2 drops of lavender and 1 drop of ylang ylang in 10ml of carrier oil or a light lotion, massaged well into the foot from the sole to the ankle. By ensuring that the whole of the sole of the foot is massaged various Reflexology points are stimulated, and this in turn helps to relax the body and encourage good sleep patterns. A Reflexologist will be able to demonstrate specific points to concentrate on should this be of interest to you.  Cover the feet with a pair of warm socks following the massage; keeping the feet warm is important as cold extremities can significantly impair the process of falling to sleep.

If waking during the night is a problem then aromatherapy can help break this cycle too. It does take a little time as the body needs reprogramming, ensuring that you stay asleep. On waking in the night have a pot of aromatherapy cream by the bed within easy reach, take a little of the cream in your hands and rub the palms together to release the essential oil vapour, then place the hands either side of the nose to create and aromatherapy ‘tent’, then breathe deeply and slowly for several breaths, keeping the eyes closed. This can very often be just enough to send you drifting back off to sleep.

Stress is one of the main causes of sleep disorders, so learning relaxation techniques such as breathing exercises and yoga can help. Massage and Reflexology have been proven to be the most effect alternatives to medication, combined with essential oils, the body learns to relax, stress levels are reduced                                                         and refreshing sleep follows naturally.

For further information about essential oils, prescription blended creams and lotions as well as Reflexology and Massage, please do not hesitate to contact me.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

Aromatherapy for Exams and Studying

Posted on 5 April, 2015 at 12:07 Comments comments (10)
As we enter the summer term students of all ages are burning the midnight oil working towards their exams. Anything that can help during this busy time is always appreciated and believe it or not aromatherapy can help in its own way. Carefully selected essential oils can boost your productivity and your health. Inhalation of an agreeable aroma can cause many changes to the body, helping to relax, stimulate and regulate many of our bodily systems.

Essential oils have been used for thousands of years, by many cultures, for improving mental activity and strengthening the memory. Our sense of smell is the strongest of the senses and is able to influence brain activity. Via our olfactory bulbs our sense of smell is linked to the limbic area of the brain, the part of the brain that is responsible for, amongst other things, our memories and emotions. An odour (such as an essential oil) can be used to stimulate this part of the brain helping our brain to function more efficiently. The connection between new ideas and scent is developed during learning, so that same scent can trigger the memory when the information is required, such as during an exam. To use this information recall technique you need to introduce new odours not used before, a different essential oils for each subject to be learnt.

Whilst studying vaporise your chosen oil close to your work station, then when it is time to sit the exam take a tissue infused with the same essential oil with you into the exam room. This will help to recall the information previously studied. Choosing an essential oil for each subject is the fun bit as there are so many oils that could be utilised:


·         Rosemary is the most cephalic essential oil; its sharp camphorous odour stimulates mental activity, aids concentration and boosts a fatigued brain as well as enhancing proscriptive memory. A study in 2003 found that participants who inhaled rosemary oil during an exam displayed significantly higher cognitive function. It is also a great stress reliever and balancer. (Not to be used if you suffer with epilepsy or high blood pressure and avoid during pregnancy).

·         Basil with its sweet, refreshing smell has similar properties to rosemary.  It clears and strengthens the mind, improving poor memory and fatigue-induced distraction and also helps to relieve headaches associated with stress and tension. (Avoid during pregnancy).

·         Peppermint is spicy, fragrant oil and a natural ‘pick-me-up’. This oil wakes the mind, focuses the senses and improves the memory. It is able to provide relief from stress and mental exhaustion due to its refreshing, stimulating odour. It clears the mind and increases focus on cognitive tasks. ( Do not use with homeopathic remedies).

·         Frankincense has a softer odour than some of the other essential oils mentioned but I had to include it for its ability to quieten the mind and support focused attention. This is a lovely oil to use at the end of a hard revision session as it actively lowers the blood pressure and calms the mind, helping to clear your head ready for a sound nights sleep.

·         Lemon has calming and clarifying properties, helping to promote concentration. It also helps to calm anger and frustration, emotions often experienced whilst studying.

·         Ginger for its ability to energise and uplift, helping to alleviate nervous and mental exhaustion. Also good for calming nausea so a good oil to use to calm pre-exam nerves.

·         Lavender is usually thought of as a relaxant that you would use before bed but its calming properties can help keep emotional stress in check. Lavender has a soothing effect on the nervous system so as well as calming nervous tension it can help relieve headaches and migraines.

·         Jasmine is a great oil for its uplifting capabilities, this oil energizes and helps produce a feeling of confidence. Use in small amounts as it can be quite a heady oil, leading to headaches if use for long periods of time.

·         Eucalyptus has a cooling and refreshing effect that uplifts and clears the head. This stimulating oil helps alleviate exhaustion and mental sluggishness. It stimulates mental activity and as it is considered a vasodilator it increases blood flow to the brain and the rest of the body. More blood to the brain=more brain power!

·         Geranium heightens the imagination so is a great oil for all anyone involved all in artistic study. Research has shown geranium oil has a synergistic relationship with the chemistry of the brain as it has been found to activate microglial cells which are integral components in the fight against neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia.


Aromatherapy is a holistic therapy, treating the body, mind and soul. Keep this in mind when studying and ensure that you get the rest, exercise and nourishment your body needs as well as giving your head chance to clear and re-focus. Whichever oils you choose I wish you the best of luck with your studies. Paula x
 

 

Essential Oils for Winter Well-Being

Posted on 3 February, 2015 at 9:07 Comments comments (29)
As the temperatures  plummet we do not automatically think of reaching for essential oils to help keep warm, however there are a group of essential oils that can be described as being ‘warming’ to the body. These oils have a rubefacient effect on the body which means that when they are applied topically they cause the dilation of capillaries and an increase in blood circulation which brings heat to the area and can significantly ease aches and pains.

Such essential oils not only bring heat to the areas applied but they can awaken dull senses, lift the spirits, they can stimulate sluggish circulation and digestion and many of these warming oils also have emollient properties helping to calm and soothe dry, irritated skin that can often occur during the colder months. The majority of them also have a strong antibacterial and antiviral action making them excellent for preventing and helping to rid the body of coughs and colds.

The best ways to use warming essential oils-
Bath- There is nothing more soothing than a warm, aromatic bath on a cold day. Once the bath has been filled add 5 drops of your chosen essential oil to 10ml of carrier oil (sesame and olive oil are especially warming) alternatively try full fat milk or honey to disperse the essential oils. Particularly effective for aches, pains and chills.

Foot and hand soak- as above but fill a bowl large enough to place the feet or hands, great for impaired circulation in the extremities or just for warming and comforting.

Massage cream/oil- Mix 3 drops of essential oil with a carrier oil or perfume free cream/lotion and massage into the skin. This is a lovely way to keep hands and feet warm and well moisturised, also good for lower back pain when briskly massaged into the affected area.

Please see my earlier Blog on the 
Safe Use of Essential Oils at Home for further information

Top 10 Warming Essential Oils

Ginger- great oil to warm the body and emotions. For the body it helps poor circulation, sluggish digestion, cold hands and feet, whereas emotionally it is stimulating and arousing, helping to dispel nervous exhaustion and the winter blues.

Sweet Marjoram-a great comforting oil, excellent for stiff muscles, and rheumatic pain. Calms and eases stress and sadness.
Patchouli- is relaxing and uplifting, it is anti-inflammatory and helps heal many skin conditions, it is a soothing and stabilising oil so helps reduce stress, anxiety and depression.

Neroli- although an expensive oils it is without a doubt the best oil for treating anxiety and other emotional problems. It calms the nerves, being soothing and uplifting. Great to use on the face during the winter months to protect the skin (1 drop in 5ml carrier oil, add to wheat germ oil for a    nourishing skin treat). 

Patchouli- is relaxing and uplifting, it is anti-inflammatory and helps heal many skin conditions, it is a soothing and stabilising oil so helps reduce stress, anxiety and depression.

Frankincense- is valued for its ability to slow and deepen the breathing, helping to control anxiety and stress. Deeply calming and revitalising oil that is especially useful in treating colds and associated throat and chest problems.

Benzoin- a great comforting oil with a sweet, warm, vanilla-like scent. A good all-rounder for the winter months as benzoin is beneficial for rheumatism and poor circulation, eases coughs, colds and chills, soothes chapped skin as well as being uplifting, revitalising and an antidpressant.

Black Pepper- has a dry, spicy and woody aroma and acts as a stimulant as well as being strengthening and comforting. Great in a foot soak for chilblains, its overall warming effect eases arthritis, rheumatic pain, stiffness and neuralgia. Also helps fight viral infections.

Bay- fresh and spicy with a warm, balsamic base note. Reviving and refreshing it is an effective antispetic for the respiratory system. 
**A strong oil that should only be used in small doses and very occasionally.**

Myrrh- resinous and smoky in aroma, myrrh is renowned for its healing properties and so is beneficial for most inflamed skin conditions. as it has a drying effect it is great as an expectorant for treating coughs and colds. This oil has a calming, spiritual effect on the body and mind, bringing about a sense of peace and tranquility.

Sandalwood- has a relaxing and uplifting effect with a sweet, woody, long-lasting fragrance. Excellent for all types of nervous tension, used in baths it is calming and relaxing as well as being soothing and hydrating to the skin.

As you can see Aromatherapy and Essential Oils offer the perfect Winter Tonic. Have fun experimenting and keep warm this winter. I'm off for my bath now.......! x





Hot & Cold Stone Massage (Geothermal Therapy)

Posted on 29 January, 2014 at 10:18 Comments comments (6)
Geothermal Therapy

Geothermal therapy, or massage with hot stones and cold stones, has become a very popular treatment over the last couple of years. Although often regarded as a luxury spa treatment a stone massage has many health benefits, from easing tight, weak muscles to improving the circulation and aiding aching joints. Many people will have experienced a hot stone massage but flinch when I mention the cold stones. The application of cold stones is short and can help with overheating during the massage, it can alleviate the sluggish feeling often experienced after a hot stone massage. When cold stones are used you feel refreshed and energised, while still retaining the benefits of the massage.  
Smooth, flat stones of varying size, are immersed in water and heated in a special heating device. The hot stones are usually made from volcanic basalt, a rock rich in iron, giving the stones a high heat retention.  Once heated to around body temperature the stones are used to glide over the back, shoulders, neck and face as well as other areas of tension. The heat from the stones, combined with essential oils, enables the muscles to release very quickly, allowing the body to reach a state of total relaxation. This comforting therapy helps tight muscles to relax 4-5 times quicker than in a standard massage, making it particularly helpful for areas of very tight, painful muscle. The cold stones are made from white marble favoured for its smooth surface and ability to retain coolness. The combination of hot and cold stones in one treatment creates a powerful reaction, being deeply relaxing and usually the switch between the two types of stone is not felt.
Hot stones - cause blood vessels to expand, increasing blood supply, this increase in circulation brings fresh blood to the muscles. Lymph function is increased helping the body rids itself of waste products. The metabolism is increased and the muscles and tissues relax as they expand.
Cold stones - cause the blood vessels to contract, sending blood and fluid away from the area and the body’s pain relievers are released, helping to numb pain. The constricted blood flow helps stop muscle spasms and relaxes the muscles. Cold stones are especially useful for helping to reduce inflammation and pain.            
This therapy is especially useful the areas of tension and muscle tightness over the upper and lower back and on the face. When used on the face hot and cold stones can help soothe headaches and the pain associated with congestion and sinus problems as well as relaxing the facial muscles to give a clearer, smoother look to the complexion. The use of cool stones around the eyes helps to decongest the region, reducing dark circ

Look After Your Body

Posted on 12 October, 2013 at 9:53 Comments comments (10)
Your body is an amazing feat of engineering. It is bone, muscle, organs, nerves and cells all working in harmony together controlled by the brain. But what happens when you have a niggling pain in your back or headaches regularly? You ignore it and hope it goes away-BUT what happens if your car has a strange rattle or develops a leak? You lavish lots of time and money on it by taking it to the garage to be fixed- after all you cannot manage without your car!
Your body is a finely tuned machine and any pains or funny rashes are warning signs of imbalances in that fine tuning. It needs caring for before more serious problems develop. No matter how busy you are you owe it to your body to listen to it and treat it with the respect it deserves. Learn to relax, when was the last time you let yourself just ‘be’? Its not indulgent or ‘pampering yourself’ to care for your body- it’s a necessity.
Aromatherapy is an herbal medicine that is really powerful as a preventative measure. It may be very effective in the treatment of aches and pains, skin disorders, digestive problems, sluggish circulation, as well as emotional problems, stress, anxiety, depression and addiction.
Most of us suffer with high levels of toxicity. Our environment is full of toxins, the air we breathe, in the water we drink and in the vegetables, meat and fish we eat. It is not surprising that our body tissues get clogged up, leaving us feeling below par and susceptible to illness. The first attack is diet and drinking plenty of mineral water. Exercise and fresh air help the body to relax, which is vital to allow the body to shift the waste deposits. Regular massage, especially massage that drains the lymphatic system (our bodies waste disposal system) combined with pure, organic aromatherapy oils is a sure fire way to help your body rid itself of as much of the toxic waste as it can. No healthy fitness programme should be without regular aromatherapy massages.

Make a promise to yourself to look after your body. Care for it- it’s the only one you have got! 

Look After Your Body

Posted on 12 October, 2013 at 9:31 Comments comments (0)